EDUO 9544: Mathematical Practice #3: Construct Viable Arguments and Critique the Reasoning of Others

Instructor: Julie Sweetman

Course Overview

This course guides the teacher towards information that will help in the successful preparation, implementation and evaluation of a classroom lesson that fulfills mathematical practice #3 (Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.)

Course Objectives:

Relating to the Common Core Mathematical Practice Standard #3, the teacher will be able to:

  1. explain the standard to people of varying abilities, ages & education
  2. use different materials to teach the standard
  3. develop an effective time line within a teaching plan
  4. create assessment processes that evaluates the ability of the students to grasp the standard
  5. analyze this class experience as to how well it helped prepare to teach the mathematical standard

Course Relation to CCS or other Professional Standards

CCSS.MATH.PRACTICE.MP3 Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others

Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and—if there is a flaw in an argument—explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.

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  • Price: $135
  • 1 Semester Credit/Unit
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Instructor: Julie Sweetman

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